Roland Monterola Labangon

Roland Monterola Labangon, Batch Masigasig

Name:  Labangon, Roland Monterola

Age: 22

Home Town: Montealegre, Tuburan, Cebu

Shipping company assignment: Lite Shipping Corporation

Awards attained during graduation ceremony:

Highest Distinction in Engine Department

How did you find out about the Regiment?

I was encouraged by my mother to join the regiment training because our local government units officials were willing to support us.  They included us as their scholars.

What was the screening process to enter the Regiment like?

In our time, the screening process is not quite difficult.  We were required to take and pass the entrance exams and medical exams.  As well as the final interview.

What were your expectations of the Regiment?

I expected the regiment to still continue their study now pay later program for the benefit of everybody, especially to those poor but deserving students.

Describe how it feels being inside the Regiment.

There are mixed feelings in the regiment.  Sometimes, you become happy but almost all the time, you could feel loneliness from being far from your family.

What were your unforgettable experiences in the Regiment?

-When I won the Don Matias H. Aznar Award for Poetry contest for two successive years as the first prize winner.

-When I became top one in engine department.

What values did you learn while in the Regiment?

I learned the core values of the regiment, the leadership, discipline and honor.

What motivates you?

What motivates me a lot is our “tatay” in the regiment, Sir Joel Santosidad because he nstilled in me the core values that are very useful to us.

How do you motivate others?

As an officer of the regiment, I motivate others by sharing my knowledge with them.  I give constructive criticism for their mistakes so that they will improve.  I also show myself as a role model.

Describe a time in the regiment where you were faced with a challenging situation and how you handled it.

The most challenging situation that I encountered in the regiment was when I was appointed as a section marcher.  This is the most difficult position that you may experience as an officer but I handled it by applying my knowledge in leading others.

Boot Camp, April 2011

For some of these young men, this is their first time being away from home and their families. After taking the MRAT (Maritime Regiment Admission Test) in their hometowns passing an initial and final interview, Boot camp is the next step. Boot camp is a seven day rigorous training program which tests the mental and physical ability of the new recruits. Jam-packed with a day full of class, drills, physical tests, protocols and a “new way of living”, these new recruits test their full abilities. Waking up at 0400H, eating a five minute meal, taking a three minute shower, marching to every destination, not having freedom of one’s own time, are only a few of the challenges the new recruits must face.  Some recruits quit because they miss home, they cannot handle the pressure or maybe for the simple reason that they don’t want to have a bald haircut.  Whatever the reason may be, only the strong and determined make it through the seven day training.  School year 2011-2012 has seven boot camp sessions lined up with at least 40 recruits per batch. Good luck recruits!

-Angie Aznar

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BuPR9Sv5kTg&feature=channel_video_title]

David Aiello Velez Zamora

David Aiello Velez Zamora, Batch Masigasig

Name:  David Aiello Velez Zamora

Age: 19 years old

Home Town: Labangon, Cebu City

Shipping company assignment: Roymar Ship Management, Inc.

Awards attained during graduation ceremony:

Admiral Aznar Excellence Award (Cadet of the Year)

Gold Medal for Academic Excellence (Highest Distinction in Deck Department)

How did you find out about the Regiment?

It was my father who told me about the Study Now, Pay Later program adopted by the Maritime Regiment of Southwestern University.  He heard the advertisment on the radio and  read about it in the newspaper.  The day after he told me I went to the said university to check it out myself.  Then I gathered all the necessary documents and requirements and applied for the Regiment’s cadetship program.

What was the screening process to enter the Regiment like?

It was like a typical screening process of a scholarship program wherein you are required to take written examinations, undergo interviews and pass the physical and medical examinations.  The experience was really nerve-racking since the exams were on different schedules and in different phases. You needed to pass each phase before proceeding to the next.  After taking each examination, you had to wait for the results for a day or two and you could’nt help but worry if you would make it past the cut-off margin since there were hundreds of us applying  for the limited slots in the program.

What were your expectations of the Regiment?

I expected it to be really hard and that I would be required to raise my standards a bit higher every day. As I expected, it did and at the end of the training, the Regiment molded me into a much better person and as a refined gentleman.

Describe how it feels being inside the Regiment.

It’s like being at home yet you’re in school.  I have hundreds of what I consider as my new “brothers” that are my schoolmates as well.  The early stages were difficult though.  Just like every journey, the first days were hard but as time went on I adjusted to the level of intensity that was required when it came to the adherence of the Regiment standards of training.

What were your unforgettable experiences in the Regiment?

There are many.  From the first day I was turn-overed into the Regiment, to my first meal, my first Regimental haircut, the first night I slept in the regiment, my first platoon assignment, my first college award, etc.  My regimental stay is truly unforgettable.

What values did you learn while in the Regiment?

Well, aside from the core values of the Regiment which is discipline, leadership and honor, I’ve learned the importance of respect, acceptance of responsibilites and time-management.  It made me grow into a wholesome individual.

What motivates you?

Practically, the best “motivator” you could ever have is your self and the belief that you will indeed succeed.  My dreams and goals in life are what motivates me the most.  My family, who believes that education is a huge privilege that is given to us and that we should deliver to the best of our capabilities to finish it, also motivates me to strive harder.

How do you motivate others?

I believe that it is somewhat the same as how I motivate myself.  I encourage others to believe in themselves and to trust that there will always be light in dark thoughts we encounter when facing challenges.  I try my best to be available when needed because  I consider my batchmates as my brothers and I symphatize with them in times of their failures and celebrate in times of success.

Describe a time in the regiment where you were faced with a challenging situation and how you handled it.

It was the time when I was being considered and assigned as a leader of my platoon.  I never had leadership experiences before I entered the Regiment and I just normally blended with the group but that wasn’t be the same situation that I faced in the Regiment.  I was appointed as the section marcher of my platoon during the first semester and then the succeding semester, as the Corps Commander of the Regiment.  All I did was deliver the best that I could as a leader. Giving no excuses and only excellent results.